The Grand Entrance, Victoria and Albert Museum, during opening hours

The Grand Entrance, Victoria and Albert Museum, during opening hours

Thanks to the team at the RIBA Library Drawings and Archives Collections, with today’s post are images revealing how one of the large models for the King’s Cross: Regenerating a London Landmark exhibition was installed. As much as the exhibits are admired, it’s probably true to say that few visitors have given much thought as to how the models got through the front doors of the Victoria and Albert Museum outside opening hours and reached their final destinations on the plinths of the V&A + RIBA Architecture Gallery on level 4.

During the exhibition’s installation, professional movers arrived with the models, which were delivered in protective wooden crates, at the entrance to the museum. The models came from  John McAslan + Partners, architects of the new Western Concourse at King’s Cross station, and made by Millennium Models. Supervised by several curators, the exhibition items slowly made their way through the museum while it was free of members of the public. Eventually they reached the gallery and were carefully unpacked and placed on plinths for public display. As the photographs indicate, it’s clearly a team effort! A big thank you goes out to all the movers.

Crate containing a model for ‘King's Cross: Regenerating a London landmark’ being moved through the Grand Entrance of the Victoria and Albert Museum (Image: © RIBA Library Drawings and Archives Collections)

One of several attempts to move a crate containing a model for ‘King’s Cross: Regenerating a London landmark’ through the Grand Entrance, Victoria and Albert Museum (Image: © RIBA Library Drawings and Archives Collections)

The crate is manually carried from Level 1 and up several flights of stairs

The crate is manually carried from Level 1 and up several flights of stairs (Image: © RIBA Library Drawings and Archives Collections)

The stairs between levels 2 and 3

The stairs between levels 2 and 3 (Image: © RIBA Library Drawings and Archives Collections)

The crate is carefully opened in the Architecture Gallery on Level 4

The crate is carefully opened in the Architecture Gallery on Level 4 for installation (Image: © RIBA Library Drawings and Archives Collections)

Unpacked and on display: A large-scale model

Unpacked and on display: A large-scale model showing a sectional cutaway roof through the roof canopy of the new entrance to King’s Cross station (Image: © RIBA Library Drawings and Archives Collections)

Close-up of model

Close-up of model

 

King’s Cross: Regenerating a London landmark. Open 19 May – 21 October 2012 at the Victoria and Albert Museum. Free entry.

 

About Wilson Yau
I work for the British Architectural Library at the RIBA as part of a team to share news, images and information online about the activities of the Library and the fascinating items we have in our architectural collections – it contains over four million items, so there's plenty to see! If you’re curious about what we do at the Library and with the collections, or want to discover the latest about our education programmes, public events and exhibitions at the RIBA, please visit www.architecture.com

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3 Comments
  1. Mrs D R Hooker

    June 25, 2012

    Really clever and excellently executed models probably even better tha the real thing!

  2. Thanks for your marvelous posting and great pictures! I really enjoyed reading it. I want to encourage you to definitely continue your great job!

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    Congratulations for this good post.

  3. An excellent exhibition with superb models. I have been totally amazed by the standard of model making that is available today, and a lot of it seems to be produced with computer controlled laser cutting. Please note also the
    models in the current Thomas Heatherwick exhibition downstairs. Had I known that his superb design for the Olympic Cauldron would revealed two weeks later I would have looked at his designs with even greater attention, and I found the design for the spinning top seats very good fun.

    Movement of Art work must always be a major problem, and the difficulties are shown here. I am always concerned for example, at say The Royal Academy, that massive pieces of marble and steel sculpture appear in exhibitions. Their installation must be an enormous problem, and I am always concerned about the floor loadings, and the capacity of the structure to deal with this.
    Overall, the display of priceless art, Canaletto’s paintings, and Tutenkhamun’s gold mask, come to mind. The Mask appears in the museum in Cairo, and is then on the move again, to exhibitions around the World, It seems in every case, that even minor damage will occur in transit, and this is a matter of considerable concern.

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