Discover the history of architecture through the RIBA’s collection of 2,000 periodical titles. Today, the British Architectural Library looks at the plan in 1912 to give Buckingham Palace a new public face:

The new front to Buckingham Palace by Aston Webb. Source: ‘The Building News and Engineering Journal’ 25 October 1912, vol. 103, pp.590-591. (© RIBA Library Books and Periodicals Collection)

The new front to Buckingham Palace by Aston Webb. Source: ‘The Building News and Engineering Journal’ 25 October 1912, vol. 103, pp.590-591. (© RIBA Library Books and Periodicals Collection)

After Paris had been transformed by Haussmann in the 19th century, writers were often lamenting at how poor London looked in comparison. With the influence of Beaux-Arts planning, there was a desire to improve and beautify London into a city suitable for the spectacle and governance of an empire. At the beginning of the 20th century grand new routes such as The Mall, Aldwych and Kingsway changed the way people moved around the capital and how London was perceived by visitors.

Buckingham Palace: Plan of the ground floor, showing the quadrangle and the addition by Blore. Source: ‘The Builder’ 1 November 1912, vol.103, p.497. (© RIBA Library Books and Periodicals Collection)

Buckingham Palace: Plan of the ground floor, showing the quadrangle and the addition by Blore. Source: ‘The Builder’ 1 November 1912, vol.103, p.497. (© RIBA Library Books and Periodicals Collection)

Appearing in the architectural press 100 years ago this month were discussions about the design for a new public façade for Buckingham Palace which would create a suitable setting for the new Victoria Monument and starting point to the processional route The Mall. Most visibly, it would replace Edward Blore’s much-criticised addition to the front of Nash’s quadrangle.

When The Building News and Engineering Journal reported on the proposals, on view in the House of Lords, by Sir Aston Webb to reface the east side of Buckingham Palace, it commented that: “Sir Aston Webb’s design is well conceived. Considering all things” (1). His design, limited by the fact he couldn’t alter the interiors and had to follow the existing line of windows, showed the influence of Wren and the Renaissance. As a successful architect and part of the architectural establishment, throughout his long career Webb was able to adapt to changing fashions. Classical architecture had supplanted Gothic and the bric-a-brac of styles of Victorian times, and its triumph in the Edwardian era could be read in  articles published at the time promoting it, for example, as the suitable style for the new capital of India, New Delhi – with or without the addition of indigenous motifs (2).

Buckingham Palace: Elevation of Blore’s design before Webb’s new façade. Source: ‘The Building News and Engineering Journal’ 1 November 1912, vol.103, pp.620-621. (© RIBA Library Books and Periodicals Collection)

Buckingham Palace: Elevation of Blore’s design before Webb’s new façade. Source: ‘The Building News and Engineering Journal’ 1 November 1912, vol.103, pp.620-621. (© RIBA Library Books and Periodicals Collection)

Typical of the British tradition of compromise, The Builder notes that the dream to rebuild the palace as the empire’s royal residence was impossible due to the nation’s finances, suggesting Webb’s scheme was the best in the circumstance (3) . The scheme would at least remove the crumbling work of Blore at a fraction of the cost of a completely new palace. There seemed to general agreement that Webb was the ideal person to take on this job. By this time he had won a Royal Gold Medal (1905) and been president of the RIBA. With Ingress Bell, he also headed a large firm of architects. These alone were not the only reasons why he was chosen. Webb had already provided the designs for the nearby Victoria Memorial, The Mall and Admiralty Arch. Both King George V and the committee for the Victoria Memorial were unanimous in approving Webb’s design for Buckingham Palace. The cost was estimated at £60,000.

In 1913 the work to create a new 300 ft façade of durable Portland Stone was complete. In the process, Webb was one of the few architects to be able to design an entire urban setting and route in London – an architectural feat that even Wren failed to achieve – and in doing so he influenced how the Royal Family were to be seen by their subjects in the future (4).

 

References:

  1. The Building News and Engineering Journal, 25 October 1912, vol.103, p.565
  2. The Architects’ & Builders’ Journal, 9 October 1912, vol.36, pp.375-379
  3. The Builder, 1 Nov 1912, vol.103, p.498
  4. Fellows, R., 1995. Edwardian architecture: style and technology. London: Lund Humphries, p.35

 

About Wilson Yau
I work for the British Architectural Library at the RIBA as part of a team to share news, images and information online about the activities of the Library and the fascinating items we have in our architectural collections – it contains over four million items, so there's plenty to see! If you’re curious about what we do at the Library and with the collections, or want to discover the latest about our education programmes, public events and exhibitions at the RIBA, please visit www.architecture.com

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