Architectural inspiration is different for everyone – from being captivated by an intriguing patterned ceiling, to finding satisfaction in the rhythmic placement of windows or wonderment at the sheer size and scale of buildings. The ‘Who rocked your world?’ drawing workshop at the RIBA’s Spring Last Tuesday event invited members of the public to plot inspirational architecture from around the world on a huge floor map. As the evening unfolded, participants watched the map grow and architectural identity over-shadow arbitrary national borders.

Participants drawing

Participants drawing

Participants adding their drawings to the map

Participants adding their drawings to the map

On the map, participants planted their drawing of their chosen building – some famous, others obscure – alongside images from the RIBA’s own collections of architectural drawings and photographs. Examples from the collections included the patterned houses of the Ndebele of South Africa, Piranesi’s drawing of the ruins of the Colosseum in Rome and Jørn Utzon’s Sydney Opera House. Drawings produced during the workshop showcased a wide range of exciting, and often widely unknown, architecture from abroad, including the Dome of the Rock in Jerusalem, the commercial edifice of Norman Foster’s Hong Kong and Shanghai Banking Corporation headquarters and the less well-known Mount Buzludzha, the now disused space-age headquarters of the Communist Party in Bulgaria.

So, who rocked your world?

The map with images from the collections and participants' drawings

The map with images from the collections and participants’ drawings

India and South-East Asia

India and South-East Asia

Middle East

Middle East

The workshop was led by Ros Croker, Library Education Curator, RIBA. See more images from the collections on RIBApix and check for more events in What’s On.

About Wilson Yau
I work for the British Architectural Library at the RIBA as part of a team to share news, images and information online about the activities of the Library and the fascinating items we have in our architectural collections – it contains over four million items, so there's plenty to see! If you’re curious about what we do at the Library and with the collections, or want to discover the latest about our education programmes, public events and exhibitions at the RIBA, please visit www.architecture.com

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