A successful exhibition relies on excellent logistics and more than a bit of hard work. Find out more about the models in the RIBA’s latest exhibition and how they were installed…

Catriona Cornelius (British Architectural Library, RIBA) with professional art movers, moving the model of Champalimaud up the grand staircase of 66 Portland Place

Catriona Cornelius (British Architectural Library, RIBA) with professional art movers moving the model of Champalimaud up the grand staircase of 66 Portland Place, May 2013.
Photograph © Lisa Nash / RIBA, British Architectural Library

It was not easy getting large models into 66 Portland Place for the Charles Correa exhibition; doorways with a fixed size had to cope with models with a diverse range of measurements, and models then had to be carefully moved through the building to their specific plinth in the galleries. It is fortunate that we have professional teams, from inside and outside the RIBA, to ensure the safety of these large models during transit, their temporary display and, for many, their long-term care as part of the collections of the RIBA.

Charles Correa exhibition: Model of Champalimaud, Lison, Portugal, made of wood, plexiglass and mixed media. Photograph © Wilson Yau/RIBA, British Architectural Library

Charles Correa exhibition: Model of Champalimaud, Lison, Portugal
Photograph © Wilson Yau / RIBA, British Architectural Library

All of the building’s display spaces are filled with items celebrating the achievements of architect Charles Correa and the architecture of India. The models have a special place, and they can be found throughout the galleries. One of the most startling has to be the model of Kanchanjunga, a concrete residential tower in Mumbai. Models can attempt to be realistic and take on a building’s form and materiality in miniature, but this one uses wood instead and reveals the spaces Kanchanjunga offers its inhabitants. Its large scale gives an adult an eye-level view of an apartment, allowing one to imagine the comfort and delight of living in the interlocking interior and outdoor rooms designed to make the most of their aspect and prime location.

Charles Correa exhibition: Model of Kanchanjunga

Charles Correa exhibition: Model of Kanchanjunga, Mumbai, India, with images of Correa’s drawings that were recently donated by the architect to the RIBA.
Photograph © Wilson Yau / RIBA, British Architectural Library

Special plinths and panels were created for every item in the exhibition. Photograph © Wilson Yau/RIBA, British Architectural Library

Charles Correa exhibition: Special plinths and panels were created for every item in the exhibition, designed by David Adjaye. They were assembled at 66 Portland Place before the models arrived.
Photograph © Wilson Yau/RIBA, British Architectural Library

Close-up of the Model of Kanchanjunga

Charles Correa exhibition: Close-up of the Model of Kanchanjunga, Mumbai, India
Photograph © Wilson Yau / RIBA, British Architectural Library

The exhibition is part of the RIBA’s Out of India Season and is open to the public until 4 September 2013. Admission is free. After it closes, apart from Champalimaud which will be returned to the Champalimaud Foundation, the models will be taken to special locations with controlled environmental conditions alongside other items from the RIBA’s collections at the British Architectural Library, this will ensure that they can be enjoyed by future generations.

Charles Correa book

To accompany the exhibition and priced £6.95 from RIBA Bookshops is the illustrated book Charles Correa: India’s Greatest Architect. It includes projects featured in the exhibition, such as Kanchanjunga and Champalimaud, along with short essays from: David Adjaye, designer of the exhibition; Irena Murray, exhibition curator; and Charles Correa.

 

About Wilson Yau
I work for the British Architectural Library at the RIBA as part of a team to share news, images and information online about the activities of the Library and the fascinating items we have in our architectural collections – it contains over four million items, so there's plenty to see! If you’re curious about what we do at the Library and with the collections, or want to discover the latest about our education programmes, public events and exhibitions at the RIBA, please visit www.architecture.com

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